W20: Educational Technology and Instructional Design

A hard week full of definitions, reflections and summaries. But at the same time, and there’s the key, an entertaining week. This week included subjects of particular importance to the design of learning content and activities with the support of ICT.

Instructional technology

As explained by the definition, the term educational technology is often associated with, and encompasses, instructional theory and learning theory.

But the definition is not what matters most to me. The question surrounding our thinking is how we do to make this technology really helps us to improve education at least in the environment of our work and academic activity.

Clearly, we can achieve great benefits such as:

  • Accessible educational materials
  • Attracting and motivating students
  • Support the development of reading and writing skills

Personally, it helps me a lot to know other experiences, theories, models and recommendations. But what helps me is tracking innovative academic experiences.

Instructional Design

It is a subject that has fascinated me. In the design of any content or learning activity assume a huge responsibility with the goal of improving student learning. But if it does not help?, If you do not have the time and sufficient resources?, If we fail to involve teachers interested?, If we do not consider aspects of prior knowledge, context, time?, To name a few. These questions arise precisely because we are interested in finding answers.

Instructional design models

We have all known at some time models like ADDIE, Dick and Carey and others.

A particularly attractive model is The Backward Design, to assist teachers in designing or redesigning teaching materials to enhance learning understanding. This model and the related conceptual framework: “Understanding by Design” was developed by recognized educators Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe. This model is well suited for the academic community and two of their biggest contributions are:

  • The “backwards design” instructional design model
  • The “Six Facets of Understanding”

As I show in my particular slides summary

The backwards design model centers on the idea that the design process should begin with identifying the desired results and then “work backwards” to develop instruction. This framework identifies three main stages:

  • Stage 1: Identify desired outcomes and results.
  • Stage 2: Determine what constitutes acceptable evidence of competency in the outcomes and results (assessment).
  • Stage 3: Plan instructional strategies and learning experiences that bring students to these competency levels.

See you next week!

16 thoughts on “W20: Educational Technology and Instructional Design

  1. Very interesting! I think your slideshare presentation was most helpful to me this week. The idea of Backward Design makes a lot of sense and has gotten me to think about my own course design.

  2. Thanks Melissa, I’ll take this opportunity to comment on http://wordpress.miracosta.edu/mconrey/2013/05/31/week-19-online-hybrid-moocs-oh-my/#respond because I had no success to post a comment directly in your blog.
    I liked your personal approach to your online teaching experience and your vision of MOOCs. I share your concerns about using MOOCs in higher education. I think it’s an issue on which we should reflect and experience more.
    I particularly liked your post especially because it is a point on which I need to improve, as I often do not comment on my own experience.

  3. Aw, this was a really good post. Finding the time and actual effort to produce a superb article… but what can I say… I procrastinate a lot and never seem to get nearly anything done.

  4. Exceptional post however I was wanting to know if you could write a litte more on this subject? I’d be very grateful if you could elaborate a little bit more. Many thanks!

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