Is climate change an “elephant in the glassware” of international education?

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The Chronicle of Higher Education publishes an interesting article on the impact of academic air travel on global warming.

Millions of people around the world, many of them young people, have mobilized in recent weeks to raise awareness about climate change.

At the same time, university institutions receive and send millions of international students to study abroad.

A clear contradiction emerges

Experiencing other countries and cultures is fundamental to international education, but air transport is one of the main factors contributing to global warming.

“It’s the huge elephant in the room,” says Ailsa Lamont, from Australia’s international education sector, who founded the Climate Action Network for International Education, or CANIE (http://www.can-ie.org/), a group that seeks to raise awareness of the environmental impact of international education – and to find solutions to mitigate it.
Lamont proposes some actions to make international educators more environmentally friendly:

  • Be a smarter traveler. Lamont believes in the value of cultural exchange, so it does not believe that students and educators should stop traveling. But they can be more intentional, by grouping visits or meeting with partners at conferences.
  • Compensation: New Zealand’s Massey University buys carbon credits to offset staff travel emissions, while overseas study provider API matches the students’ $15 offset contribution. Middlebury offers $500 scholarships to students traveling abroad for sustainability or research projects. The University of Gothenburg, Sweden, charges a fee for staff members’ air travel and uses the funds to support projects that reduce the institution’s environmental impact.
  • Use technology. Technology is not a substitute, but it helps to hold meetings at a distance by limiting travel. Online courses also help link students with classrooms abroad.
  • Increase visibility. Universities can open a broad debate on sustainability. CANIE (http://www.can-ie.org/) hopes to put climate change on the agenda of international education conferences through roundtables, poster fairs and meetings.

Read the article at http://bit.ly/2oK7ugE (requires free registration).

The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper and website that features news, information and papers for faculty and student affairs professionals at colleges and universities.

Innovating Pedagogy 2019

This report explores new forms of teaching, learning and assessment to guide educators and policy-makers.

A full-text PDF version of this report is available to download from:
https://iet.open.ac.uk/file/innovating-pedagogy-2019.pdf

This seventh report proposes ten innovations, many of which are currently implemented but have not yet had a profound influence on education. To produce the report, a group of academics from The Open University collaborated with researchers from Norway’s Centre for the Science of Learning & Technology.

From a long list of new educational terms, theories and practices, this short list of ten innovations has the potential to bring about major changes in educational practice.

What We Learned From Reading 1,000 Articles On Lifelong Learning

A very interesting article about Lifelong Learning.

The 20 conclusions:

  1. There is a growing interest in continuous and lifelong learning
  2. People are naturally curious and lifelong learners
  3. Younger people have a particularly strong focus on lifelong learning
  4. The knowledge economy drives continuous learning
  5. Change means continuous learning
  6. Change also means unlearning
  7. Organisations aim to recruit lifelong learners
  8. Organisations need to support the continuous learners they recruit
  9. CEOs must address lifelong learning
  10. Continuous learning platforms are the future
  11. Continuous learning will disrupt current learning approaches
  12. The future is open, continuous and embedded
  13. Shifting responsibilities for learning
  14. Learners have the key responsibility
  15. Continuous learning means doing not just reading or studying
  16. Continuous learning is essential for career success
  17. Job security is being employable
  18. Lifelong learning is about more than career success
  19. Continuous learning needs to be a habit
  20. Algorithms are also continuous learners

Read the complete post on https://blog.anderspink.com/2018/05/what-we-learned-from-reading-1000-articles-on-lifelong-learning/

The Online Learning Guidebook

An interesting guide to help students of all ages learn more effectively online.

http://www.accreditedschoolsonline.org/online-schools-guidebook/

As online education continues to grow, many schools are making online education a major part of their curriculum. To help students understand this trend, the guide also includes a detailed breakdown of online learning methods and technologies, as well as information on how to identify quality online schools or programs.

The guide looks at Khan Academy, Coursera and MIT OpenCourseware specifically and includes advice and keys to success from a panel of online learning experts.