Categories
Instructional Design

Week 24: Summarize, assess and contribute

List of links to all my posts for the year

Library of Alexandria

Week 1 – Getting started with Program For Online Teaching class

It’s just my presentation and a description of my own experience about online teaching and my particular expectative with this program.

Week 2: Teaching and Learning Online

Starting with the program readings, and identify the elements I feel would help me to reinforce the way I like to teach. I’m still in the exploring period.

Week 3: Pedagogy and Course Design

I’m going deeper in the study of the book material, the web material taking notes and highlighting.

Week 4: Pedagogy and Course Design II

My try applying a template to the planning of a course session related to Concept Maps. Good exercise!

Week 5: The Slippery Online Syllabus

This week helps me to discover the Online Syllabus one of THE most important documents created for the online class. Really good and useful!

Week 6: Internet Skills, html code and embedded Videos

A practical exercise embedding videos. Not especially new for me…

Week 7: LMS – “to be or not to be”

My first shade of difference with the author (Reading the chapter 6 of Ko&Rossen) in relation to the role of LMS and CMS.

Week 8: LMS – “to be or not to be” (the continuous discussion …)

A good week! because I could see preliminary reinforced my intuitive arguments about the role of the LMS. This post demanded a great effort to express my ideas.

Week 9: trying to catching up…

Taking notes about the reading material, a rather poor reflecting post…

Week 10: open platforms for online courses

Good reading and a good practical week. I discovered a tool (engrade) that I’m using today!

Week 11: Intellectual Property and Accessibility

A post with which I am not satisfied. Probably because the uninspiring reading material.

Week 12: Resources Online

There are obviously weeks that are more or less inspiring. The OER is a topic of special attraction for me. This week I researched several reference websites as expressed in the post.

Mid-year post

A list of links to all your posts so far. It’s refreshing to read this post to identify my personal progress.

Week 13: Creating Class Elements Part 1: Images and screenshots

The activities of this week I gave a good learning in managing my images on Flickr, as expressed in the post content.

Week 14: Creating Class Elements Part 2: Audio and video

A tough week in which I learned a lot. A productive week, as showed in the post.

Week 15: Screencasting and multimedia

Another productive week with building materials with the help of different web tools.

Week 16: Our Students Online

This week included a lot of reading I really enjoyed with. These moments are a good time to analyse and draw conclusions.

Week 17: Classroom Management and Facilitation

Good reading and reflection!

Week 18: The Course (or Learning) Management System

I think it was the week with further analysis and reflection. I Party analysis of the role of the LMS / CMS to project a pedagogic and strategic discussion.

Week 19-Web-Enhanced, Hybrid and Open Classes

It has been a useful discussion about MOOCs.

Week 20: Educational Technology and Instructional Design

I am very happy with this week. From the discussion on “Educational Technology and Instructional Design”, I’ve developed a particular line of reflection on an instructional design model.

Week 21: Introduction to Online Education Theory

Another week with which I am happy because it allowed me expand on an interesting theoretical discussion.

Week 22: Personal Learning Networks

As I wrote in this post, one of the things that I find particularly interesting is to collect ideas and inspiration from outstanding lecturers, teachers and writers.

Week 23: Presentation

This is my presentation on Week 12: Online Resources.

A summary of my conclusions

  • Although 4-5 hours a week seems reasonable, some weeks I spent a few more hours. In the beginning I didn’t realize how much more time I’d expend in my researches.
  • Although my comments on the blogs of my colleagues often was not what I had wanted, I have improved my writing and I must admit it is very encouraging to receive comments!
  • This program gave me the opportunity to explore different theories, inspiring ideas and experiences.
  • In short, the program has exceeded my expectations.
Categories
Online Pedagogy

Week 23: Presentations

This is my presentation. I explored different topics, until finally I decided on Week 12: Online Resources

OER Tutorial

Categories
Lifelong Learning Web 2.0 Tools

W22: Personal Learning Networks

One of the things that I find particularly interesting is to collect ideas and inspiration from outstanding lecturers, teachers and writers.

From Ko & Rossen, Chapter 14: “Taking Advantage of New Opportunities”, I have found interesting proposals on activities that I would like to further develop in relation to online teaching:

  • Training covering teaching methods and curriculum development
  • Methodologies about Lifelong Learning
  • New ideas and technologies
  • Short online courses and tutorials in particular software platforms and tools

Another example is Dean Shareski, in the video “Sharing: The Moral Imperative“, arise questions and reflections of value for the analysis about the personal culture of sharing:

  • Why would I do this? (sharing)
  • Is this worth my time?
  • How do I make it valuable and meaningful?
  • and also about the culture of sharing of our educational institutions:
  • Is this an obligation?
  • Does my institution see value in sharing?
  • How will it help my students?
  • Sharing has always been part of the teacher’s job

A good and inspirational Video from Alec Couros, “Teaching and Learning in a Networked World (2010)“, which mention own and others ideas, as:

  • Connect with others: colleagues who are local, and more internationally. Build a personal learning network, as with Twitter.
  • Create a culture of sharing: in schools, within the structure, sharing resources (David Wiley’s “open content” — without sharing there is not education).
  • Stephen Downes: (we) should move beyond the idea of education as being something provided for us, and toward something we create for ourselves.
  • Will Richardson: about the 21st Century Learning – explore what happens to traditional concepts of teaching when we can learn anything any time?

My Personal Learning Network

I started the creation of a personal site with iGoogle for some years ago, connecting my favourite news sites, my blog, additional interesting blogs, Web 2.0 tools and some useful personal bookmarks, both in English and Spanish.

The last time I have reflected a lot about the way I’m working with my personal learning, specially using technology to expand my learning network.

This picture reflects my preliminary conclusions.

PLN
Categories
Online Pedagogy Web 2.0 Tools

W 21: Introduction to Online Education Theory

Really interesting article Larry Sanger, Individual Knowledge in the Internet Age (2010), especially regarding the three common strands of current thought about education and the Internet:

  1. The instant availability of information online makes the memorization of facts unnecessary or less necessary.
  2. The virtues of collaborative learning as superior to outmoded individual learning.
  3. Lengthy, complex books, which constitute a single, static, one-way conversation with an individual, are inferior to knowledge co-constructed by members of a group.

Larry deepens around the strand of Unnecessary Memorization. Inevitably, if I say that I know something is because I remember. The bad reputation of memorization is associated with the mindless and not reflected repetition.

This article discusses other arguments worth mentioning:

  • if you read an answer to a question, you usually need fairly substantial background knowledge to interpret the answer.
  • you need knowledge in order to know what questions to ask.
  • a good education is not merely to amass a lot of facts.
  • If you do not have copious essential facts at the ready, then you will not be able to make wise judgments that depend on your understanding of those facts
  • we should “learn how to learn”
  • the ability to learn new things is more important than ever “in a world where you have to process new information at lightning speed.”
  • “Children are going to have to reinvent their knowledge base multiple times.

I stopped a little longer in the article: George Siemens, Networks, Ecologies, and Curatorial Teaching (2007). Interesting reflexions on what he calls learning ecology around which I have built the attached presentation.

 

Categories
Instructional Design

W20: Educational Technology and Instructional Design

A hard week full of definitions, reflections and summaries. But at the same time, and there’s the key, an entertaining week. This week included subjects of particular importance to the design of learning content and activities with the support of ICT.

Instructional technology

As explained by the definition, the term educational technology is often associated with, and encompasses, instructional theory and learning theory.

But the definition is not what matters most to me. The question surrounding our thinking is how we do to make this technology really helps us to improve education at least in the environment of our work and academic activity.

Clearly, we can achieve great benefits such as:

  • Accessible educational materials
  • Attracting and motivating students
  • Support the development of reading and writing skills

Personally, it helps me a lot to know other experiences, theories, models and recommendations. But what helps me is tracking innovative academic experiences.

Instructional Design

It is a subject that has fascinated me. In the design of any content or learning activity assume a huge responsibility with the goal of improving student learning. But if it does not help?, If you do not have the time and sufficient resources?, If we fail to involve teachers interested?, If we do not consider aspects of prior knowledge, context, time?, To name a few. These questions arise precisely because we are interested in finding answers.

Instructional design models

We have all known at some time models like ADDIE, Dick and Carey and others.

A particularly attractive model is The Backward Design, to assist teachers in designing or redesigning teaching materials to enhance learning understanding. This model and the related conceptual framework: “Understanding by Design” was developed by recognized educators Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe. This model is well suited for the academic community and two of their biggest contributions are:

  • The “backwards design” instructional design model
  • The “Six Facets of Understanding”

As I show in my particular slides summary

The Backward Design from Jaime Oyarzo Espinosa

The backwards design model centers on the idea that the design process should begin with identifying the desired results and then “work backwards” to develop instruction. This framework identifies three main stages:

  • Stage 1: Identify desired outcomes and results.
  • Stage 2: Determine what constitutes acceptable evidence of competency in the outcomes and results (assessment).
  • Stage 3: Plan instructional strategies and learning experiences that bring students to these competency levels.

See you next week!

Categories
MOOC

w19-Web-Enhanced, Hybrid and Open Classes

The educational use of Internet pursues pedagogically relevant answers to enable the building (and improve) a sociocultural learning environment.

These teaching environments: face-to-face, hybrid or fully online need to answer the fundamental question: whom do I want to learn?

The educational use of Internet is not just about the integration of tools and web resources to the teaching-learning process in order to enhance learning. Internet main contribution is to incorporate means, resources, languages ​​and social interaction dynamics that enrich the relationship between students and instructors.

It is clear that the internet is more present outside than inside the classroom. Internet for education aims to “synchronize” the classroom with the reality existing outside the classroom. This process not only involves the insertion of technological solutions, but in the development of an autonomous, constructivist, critical, and collaborative learning environment.

What about the MOOCs?

MOOC

George Siemens makes an interesting reflection on MOOCs focused on two factors:

  1. The learning potential for society (globally)
  2. The learning theory and pedagogical models that influence different types of MOOCs.

Although George Siemens considers the latter as a secondary factor, it seems to me important to analyze regarding the MOOC Completion Rates.

The ratio of high initial interest registered participants and the high level of abandonment is related, among other factors, to:

  • The effect of initial attraction produced by curiosity
  • No evaluation of prior knowledge requirements

It is likely that the high registration of participants attracted by curiosity diminish over time and MOOCs attract really interested participants. On the other hand, curiosity has been for me a very important factor to learn (and to review) about MOOCs, although I have completed a few courses.

The requirements that currently use most MOOCs are simple test with a low level of evaluation. These assessment systems is still in its early stages of development, and include assessment methods such as Peer Review, Calibrated Peer Review or Automated Essay Scoring. These systems are currently being studied in depth by MIT Edx (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Read Stephen P. Balfour, ASSESSING WRITING IN MOOCS